Notes Vocabulary

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Notes Marie, Femke, Maria

Data Biographies

The web is more a social creation than a technical one. I designed it for a social effect — to help people work together — and not as a technical toy.The ultimate goal of the Web is to support and improve our weblike existence in the world. We clump into families, associations, and companies. We develop trust across the miles and distrust around the corner.

—Tim Berners-Lee, Weaving The Web

[used as an introduction to XFN]

http://activearchives.org/wiki/Faces_of_vocabulary#WikiProject_Persondata

What kind of subject is FOAF, facebook, vcard, biography producing?

Defining yourself through a succession of friends, organisations and lineage, idea of linear biography [ref: Foucault about biopolitics: "you are not in school, now, you are in the army". Life is entering and leaving institutions one after the other in a linear way: school to army, army to work, work to hospital, hospital to cemetery]; it is more fuzzy than that. How can we express our lives differently?

In a classical CV, failings are hidden. Ref: Digitales CV workshop. How to value your experience when that is not a proper job, diploma, education. (systems of 'belonging')

Replacing a vertical lineage (family) by a horizontal one (friends), but the problems are still the same. 'It' makes social sorting possible, based on categories of people.

  • What constitutes a data-identity
  • What goes missing, what is consensus about relevance?
  • How are you supposed to speak about yourself
  • How are others speaking about you, when, in what context?

History of the vocabulary: who, when, where - community, context, culture

How is the information connected, re-combined, averaged, used, distributed

How is the data technically organised? API, store, centralized, format

Who is using the vocabulary, where is it put to use?

FOAF

http://www.foaf-project.org/

Hypothesis: FOAF is developed in an institutional or business context.

- term: project is not stable, under discussion

- persons can not be linked to projects

- groups, collaborative work is hard to express

- #me

The birthday issue

Who is the community developing FOAF?

Blogger community -- wordpress used to have it? Not anymore. When, why did they decide to remove it?

vCard, linked-in

vCard: electronic business cards - 1995, so pre-internet, blogging

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VCard

vCard vs. FOAF

vCard: implicit that info is related to a person, one person can have multiple cards, no relation between them possible. Pragmatic? Makes sense? A feature!

A strict separation between public and private ... card is for public. Today: much more blurred!

Comparison foaf-pim-vcard:

http://www.ibiblio.org/hhalpin/homepage/notes/vcardtable.html

Lois, Clark and the man of steel (About vcard and foaf):

http://lid.netmesh.org/wiki/FOAF_fields

"User centric digital identity"

Schema.org

A shared markup vocabulary makes easier for webmasters to decide on a markup schema and get the maximum benefit for their efforts. So, in the spirit of sitemaps.org, Bing, Google and Yahoo! have come together to provide a shared collection of schemas that webmasters can use.

Person A person (alive, dead, undead, or fictional).

http://schema.org/Person

Organization An organization such as a school, NGO, corporation, club, etc.

http://schema.org/Organization

Businesscards

Japan -- exchanging businesscard as a form of dis-ambiguation: to make sure spelling and pronounciation match.

19th century callingcards

Calling-card as a social interface: Gentleman would also inscribe initials upon the card to denote the reason for his visit. The initials stood for the following French words:


   p. f. – congratulations (pour féliciter)


   p. r. – expressing one’s thanks (pour remercier)


   p. c. – mourning expression (pour condoléance)


   p. f. N. A. – Happy New Year (pour feliciter Nouvel An)


   p. p. c. – meaning to take leave (pour prendre congé)


   p. p. – if you want to be introduced to anybody, send your visiting card (pour présenter)


biography

We know: biography: developed by/for historians

- Geneology takes precedence

- Linear feel to the vocab; time (before/after) seems important: chronology

- Example given biography: Albert Einstein

What if you only want to tell an ordinary life? Coronation :-)

If not, do you just exist through marriage and lineage?

"The participation ontology is a simple model for describing the roles that people play within groups"

http://vocab.org/participation/schema

The relationship vocabulary for describing relationships between people:

http://vocab.org/relationship/.html

Facebook, OpenGraph, personal profiles

Hypothesis: facebook profiles do not support diversity?

Social graph -- profiles of real life things:

- movies

- restaurants

- celebrities

http://www.facebook.com/blog.php?post=10150289612087131

The gender discussion: Female, male and other?

Interest in ...

The birthday issue

Close friends?

Possible relations - It's complicated

Education and work - employer

Look at the API: what data is exposed? And what does that mean?

XFN™ (XHTML Friends Network)

http://gmpg.org/xfn/

Benefits of identity consolidation

Nowadays, particularly with the emergence of social networks, people exist on many different and disparate sites. You may have a blog, a Twitter profile, a Facebook page, and more. With all of these distributed sites, a user may want a way to indicate that each site represents the same person. This is known as identity consolidation, and XFN supports it.

One of the values for XFN is me (assigned to links as rel="me"). By assigning this value to the links to all of your online "identities," you are indicating that each site represents you, effectively consolidating your identity without having to centrally maintain that information.

The key to identity consolidation with rel="me" is that each site in your online identity must have this XFN value applied. The logic is where any site claims another site, the identity between the two is consolidated.

http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1409795

Guidelines wikipedia for biographies

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Biographies_of_living_persons

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Biography

Template for biographies: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:WikiProject_Biography

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_Style_%28biographies%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Fictional_characters. For sampler biography of fictional character see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mario

http://activearchives.org/aaa/resources/844/

Name

2.1.1 Maiden names

2.1.2 Child named for parent or predecessor

2.1.3 Pseudonyms, stage names and common names

2.1.4 Royal surnames

2.1.5 Academic titles

2.1.6 Post-nominal initials

2.1.7 Honorifics

2.1.7.1 Honorific prefixes

2.1.7.2 Honorific titles

2.2.1 Family members with the same surname

Notability

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Notability_%28people%29

A person is presumed to be notable if he or she has been the subject of multiple published secondary sources which are reliable, intellectually independent of each other, and independent of the subject. If the depth of coverage in any given source is not substantial, then multiple independent sources may be combined to demonstrate notability; trivial coverage of a subject by secondary sources may not be sufficient to establish notability.[6]

Primary sources may be used to support content in an article, but they do not contribute toward proving the notability of a subject.

Wikipedia:Categorization of people

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Categorization_of_people

3.1 By association

3.2 By gender, religion, race or ethnicity, and sexuality

3.3 By the person's name

3.4 By nationality and occupation

3.5 By place

3.6 By year

Occupations

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_people_by_occupation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Fictional_characters_by_occupation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Persondata Persondata is a special set of metadata that can and should be added to biographical articles only. It consists of standardized data fields with basic information about the person that, unlike conventional Wikipedia content, can be automatically extracted and processed by cataloging tools.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Autobiography Writing an autobiography on Wikipedia is strongly discouraged, unless your writing has been approved by other editors in the community. Wikipedia has gone through many prolonged disputes about the significance, factual accuracy, and neutrality of such articles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Fictional_characters

Template Biography

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Biography

BLPs should be written responsibly, cautiously, and in a dispassionate tone, avoiding both understatement and overstatement.

Articles should document in a non-partisan manner what reliable secondary sources have published about the subject, and in some circumstances what the subject has published about himself. BLPs should not have trivia sections.

Do not give disproportionate space to particular viewpoints; the views of tiny minorities should not be included at all

EFAE

Further information: Wikipedia:Attack pages and Wikipedia:Criteria for speedy deletion#G10

Pages that are unsourced and negative in tone, especially when they appear to have been created to disparage the subject, should be deleted at once if there is no policy-compliant version to revert to; see below. Non-administrators should tag them Template:Db-attack.

Ask yourself whether the source is reliable; whether the material is being presented as true; and whether, even if true, it is relevant to a disinterested article about the subject.

Avoid self-published sources

Never use self-published sources—including but not limited to books, zines, websites, blogs, and tweets—as sources of material about a living person, unless written or published by the subject (see below). "Self-published blogs" in this context refers to personal and group blogs. Some news organizations host online columns that they call blogs, and these may be acceptable as sources so long as the writers are professionals and the blog is subject to the newspaper's full editorial control. Posts left by readers are never acceptable as sources.[4] See below for our policy on self-published images.

When seeking advice about whether to publish something about a living person, be careful not to post so much information on the talk page that the inquiry becomes moot.

Administrators may enforce the removal of clear BLP violations with page protection or by blocking the violator(s), even if they have been editing the article themselves or are in some other way involved. In less clear cases they should request the attention of an uninvolved administrator at Wikipedia:Administrators Noticeboard/Incidents.

Avoid repeating gossip

Ask yourself whether the source is reliable; whether the material is being presented as true; and whether, even if true, it is relevant to a disinterested article about the subject.

Never use self-published sources—including but not limited to books, zines, websites, blogs, and tweets—as sources of material about a living person, unless written or published by the subject (see below). "Self-published blogs" in this context refers to personal and group blogs. Some news organizations host online columns that they call blogs, and these may be acceptable as sources so long as the writers are professionals and the blog is subject to the newspaper's full editorial control. Posts left by readers are never acceptable as sources.[4] See below for our policy on self-published images.

Wikipedia contains biographical material on people who, while notable enough for an entry, are not generally well known. In such cases, exercise restraint and include only material relevant to their notability, focusing on high quality

=========

FOAF project: creating a web of machine readable pages that describe people

A distribute way of showing, describing social networks. Remember friendster?

Data

American ... academic: school

FOAF vs. Facebook

- mapping vocabularies

- changing bios, updating ...

- rewriting same bio in different formats (or: projecting vocabularies on existing bio)

-

Carol Smillie: http://note.pad.constantvzw.org:8000/92

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